Tag Archive for Apple

When is an iPhone 4 not a phone?

A: When you’re left handed.

Surprisingly there is one big complaint about the new iPhone 4. If you make a call with the phone in your left hand you might not receive a cellular signal.

The redesign of the iPhone 4 moved the antenna to an external stainless steel band that wraps around the phone. A significant portion of this antenna band is on the left hand side of the phone. So when you hold the phone in your left hand, the flashy part of your palm below the thumb can significantly reduce or block the cellular signal needed to make a call.

How not to hold an iPhone 4

How not to hold an iPhone 4 (Credit: Apple / Screenshot by Scott Ard/CNET)

Interestingly, at June’s Apple Worldwide Developers Conference, Steve Jobs praised this antenna redesign as “brilliant engineering” and commented that it has never been done before. In a report on iPhone 4 signal issuesby cnet news’s Scott Ard mentions “some other companies may have considered a similar solution but backed off due to the attenuation caused when a person’s hand ‘covers both sides of the black strip in the metal band,’ as Apple put it”

He also points out that during Jobs’s demonstration he used WiFi instead of the AT&T cellular network. The Wifi signal portion of the antenna is higher up on the band, and less likely to be covered by your hand or fingers. Steve Jobs, himself, has a tendency to hold the iPhone in his left hand, so he may very well have been aware of the reception issue that would cause.

Now that word of the reception problem is spreading, word has it Apple suggests “not holding the phone in your left hand to make a call”. Or to use a case or bumpers that lift your hand off the edge of the phone. The bumpers from Apple cost $29. maybe Apple should send them out for free to iPhone 4 owners.

For more information on the signal reception problem with the iPhone 4see this report at AppleInsider.com.

HP Photosmart Premium All-in-One C309 conflicts with iPod

Hello, folks! Hope you had a great weekend. I’m getting better, too.

So last week I mentioned I had been helping a client with a HP Photosmart Premium All-in-One C309 printericon that was causing trouble with his iPods. The client had just replaced a printer in their home office, but now when they attached their iPods to synchronize their music they were alerted that the device was not recognized. They suspected they had done something wrong when installing the printer, so they reinstalled it, updated their iTunes software, but still no luck with their iPods.

After a little research and double-checking I had learned that there were other reported cases of an iPod not being recognized after a HP Photosmart Premium All-in-One C309 printericon had been added to the computer system. So I unplugged the printer, connected the iPod, and lo and behold the iPod was recognized once more.

No one wants to have to remember to unplug their printer to access their iPods. And no one wants to have to rememeber they disconnected their printer before they go to print something.

What to do?

Fortunately, the HP Photosmart C309 printericon comes equipped with WIFI (wireless capability). Furthermore, the client had a wireless router in their office as well. The HP C309 also works with a wired network connection, which I would preferred to use, but they didn’t have a spare network cable.

So I configured the HP C309 to access the wireless network using the instruction provided in the owners manual for the printer. The C309 supports WEP and encryption tools for a secure wireless link. Furthermore their router accepts MAC filtering (the unique identifier tag associated with any wireless capable device) to restrict which devices are allowed to access the network. Their PC is wired to the router, otherwise I could have set the PC to connect wirelessly to the printer without goin g through the router.

A few minutes later the printer was wirelessly online with the network, and the iPods could be relied upon to be recognized once more when attached via USB.

I know there are more people out there experiencing this problem. I hope this article helps you out. If anyone has discovered other solutions to this problem, let me know.

If you’re interested in learning more about the products in this article, click the images and text links for more information.

New iPod Nano Shoots Video and plays FM Radio

I thought this was pretty amazing, but the new iPod Nano (5th Generation) has a video camera in it. Yep, the new nano shoots video. Now, if you’ve seen the Nano, you know that it’s just a little bit bigger than a lighter. Imagine a video camera the size of a lighter.

That’s kind of amazing. Right?

And as you can see, it’s available at MacMall.com, the Apple Superstore.

Shameless plugs aside, let’s look take a closer look at the iPod nano.

The back of the new iPod Nano has a camera lens, and next to the camera lens there’s a pinhole. A pinhole microphone, that is. So you can shoot video with sound, too.

Three years ago, I bought a 2nd Generation iPod Nano, and I still use it to this day. Back then, $199 got you 8 GB of storage space for holding about 2,000 songs. The 2nd Gen iPod Nano didn’t play video. That was a bit of downer for me at the time, but I’ve lived with it.

nano-videoHere we are 3 years later and the Nano hasn’t gotten any bigger, and now it plays video, and it records video.

What’s more than that? It plays FM radio now with a built-in FM tuner, and you can even pause the radio while you’re listening to a station. Think of it as Tivo for radio in an iPod. Apple calls this Live Pause. The radio is recorded onto the iPod, so you can pause a song while you listen. While the song is paused the station is recorded to the Nano’s flash drive.

nano-radioNow my 3 year old iPod Nano only held 2,000 or 8 GB worth of music (no video) and it set me back $200, but now for just $179 you can get 16 GB of storage for 4,000 songs or 16 HOURS of video.

Now, that is amazing. I’m sold.

Head over to MacMall.com, the Apple Superstore, and get your iPod Nano, now. There’s an 8GB model for $149 and the 16GB model for $179. You can also get a Free Altec lansing Portable iPod/iPhone speaker (a $39 value) with it. There’s also an option to get free engraving and a free charger. You pay for the engraving and charger now, but you get your money back from a rebate later.

Connect a MacBook Air to an Optoma PK 101 pico projector

Optoma PK101

Optoma PK101

Back in mid-December of 2008, I reviewed two new micro, or pico, projectors: The Dell M109S and the Optoma PK 101. The Dell model was designed to connect to a wide range of devices with its multi-cable adapter, but the Optoma PK 101 (the sexier of the two devices) was designed, primarily, to connect to devices with composite video connections, though it came bundled with an adapter for iPods and iPhones.

My Optoma PK 101 review mentioned that “The Optoma PK101 isn’t configured for connecting to a laptop or computer. unless the computer itself as a special video output.”

A few days ago, Mark Canavan, a Skylarking reader, wrote in asking, “How can I connect the Optoma PK101 to a MacBook Air laptop?”

Here’s your answer, Mark. I’ve also added this information to the end of my original review of the Optoma PK 101 projector.

Apple Micro-DVI to Video Adapter

The Optoma PK 101 is designed to connect to devices that have composite video connections. The MacBook Air has a mini display port that can be used as follows. If you’re averse to tech-talk, just ignore the stuff in the parentheses:

This is according to the MacBook Air’s Technical Specifications web page.

According to a MacBook Air Developer Note from Jan. 18, 2008:

The MacBook Air ships with a micro-DVI to DVI adapter and a micro-DVI to VGA adapter. A micro-DVI to video adapter, which provides composite and S-video support, is sold separately.

The Apple Micro-DVI to Video Adapter (shown above right) is available from the Apple Store in the US and Canada for $19. Apple says, “The Micro-DVI to Video Adapter was designed specifically to fit the slim profile of MacBook Air. The adapter connects to the Micro-DVI port on your MacBook Air and provides both S-video and Composite video connectors so that you can view content from your computer on such devices as TVs, VCRs, or overhead projectors with S-Video or RCA (Composite) connectors.”

Thanks for your question, Mark!




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More Info for Connecting an iPod to a home stereo


Back on Sept. 16, 2008, I wrote an article regarding connecting your PC or iPod to a home stereo. A reader, LD, asked about the pros and cons of using a stereo y-connector with the iPod’s headphone jack, which I offered as a relatively low cost solution in my earlier post, versus connecting with a y-connector or kit with Apple’s Universal Dock. You can read his full comments and questions with the original post here.

Here’s my take on the headphone jack versus the universal dock approach:

Apple Universal Dock - Apple Store (U.S.)

Docking Port
I’ll assume the docking port in question is the
Apple Universal Dock from the Apple Store (U.S.)
($49). One advantage is it looks cleaner/neater sitting next to your stereo instead of a loose headphone cable, and it comes with a remote control. If you add a USB power adapter ($29) you could also charge the iPod, but the same holds true without the docking port. If you choose to use the universal dock, your standard 1/8″ stereo y-connector ($7.49) can be used.

Cable and Monster Cable

Belkin Y Adapter Cable - Apple Store (U.S.)

I find the headphone cable and jack suitable, and I consider myself to be something of an audiophile when it comes to stereo equipment, but care must be exercised with the volume control. The rule of thumb with stereo equipment is to always have the volume turned down before turning on any equipment. Taking care to do so has always worked fine for me.

Don’t get me wrong, I love Belkin and Monster Cable, but I’ll pass on them if I’m trying to hold onto my cash that day or week. Currently, I use an ordinary stereo y-connector from Radio Shack, and I have had no problems with it. I play my iPod on the stereo a few times a month, and just leave the cable in plain view.  No one else in the household has complained yet, and most of them are much neater and more organized than I.

To clarify, the standard stereo y-connector will connect to the universal dock, but get the Monster Cable if its in your budget. Their cable is of a higher gauge, and does make a audible difference if you have an ear for it.

Feedback and Amplification
It’s true that the iPod output level with just the headphone jack is affected by the iPod’s own volume control. You should always start with the volume on the stereo and iPod turned down. Then turn up the stereo volume to a level you usually find suitable — you won’t hear anything until you turn up the iPod’s volume — and then set the iPod to play and turn up it’s volume control. Resist the urge to make it “extra loud” by turning it up too high.

Though I don’t have a docking port now, it has been my experience that any device that utilizes the iPod’s connector, instead of the jack, disables the volume control of the iPod wheel. Using the iPod wheel will have no affect on volume.

Another note: Care should be taken when the stereo is on, but an iPod isn’t connected to the jack (without the dock). If your stereo gets set to that input, and if something charged or metallic comes in contact with the end of the jack — think kid’s fingertips or some stray metal object like a set of keys set to rest on the shelf — then harmful feedback could occur. My headphone jack is set well out of reach, so I’m likely to be the only offender.

Thanks for your questions and comments, LD. I’m glad I could be of help.



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17 inch MacBook Pro shipping late January

`17 inch MacBook pro

`17 inch MacBook pro

At last week’s MacWorld Expo, Apple announced they would be shipping a new 17-inch MacBook Pro laptop near the end of January. Rumors had been circulating prior to the announcement that Apple would be announcing a quad core processor laptop, but this was not it. The new MacBook Pro is built around a “unibody chassis”, that is, it is carved from a single block of aluminum. Pricing will start around $2,800.

Battery Life

Apple Online Store

The big news was its battery life. Apple states its battery is rated to last “up to” 7 or 8 hours on a single charge, and that it may be recharged up to 1,000 times.  (Compare this to other laptops which may only hold a 3 or 4 hour charge with a recharge life of 200 to 300 charges.) You can watch Apple’s video regarding its battery design below.

Apple rates the battery for 200 charges per year, so at 1,000 charges the battery will need replacing in 5 years.  Of course users who frequently save to the hard drive will have to charge the battery more frequently.  If you use your laptop on weekends, you may find yourself recharging the battery for than 200 times per year, too.

Apple Online Store

Still, this is a pretty big boost in battery life, but, once the battery’s lifetime ends, you won’t be able to change the battery yourself.  You will have to take it to an Apple store or authorized reseller for replacement. This might be difficult for owners who live in remote areas. The battery costs about $160.

Admittedly, not everyone runs on their batteries every day. Deskbound MacBooks will find themselves plugged into a wall outlet.

Weight

The 17 inch MacBook Pro is also one of the heaviest MacBooks on the market. With its battery being 40% larger than previous batteries, and its block of aluminum chassis, it weighs a full pound more than the 15 inch MacBook Pro, but is still within the same weight range as other laptops in its class.

Blu-ray?

MacBook fans who were hoping for a Blu-ray DVD drive for high def video or data storage will have to wait a little bit longer. There is no Blu-ray in this MacBook, and there is no option available for one as at upgrade at time of purchase either (at this time).

Solid State Drive

The $2,800 model has a standard 320 GB (gigabyte) Serial ATA (SATA) hard drive, but two solid state drive upgrade options are available for $500 (128 GB) and $900 (256 GB). Though smaller in capacity, the solid state drives (SSD) provide greater durability and shock resistance over the standard SATA drives. Standard drives have moving parts, but sold state drives have no moving parts. Solid state drives are similar to the flash memory chips found in the digital cameras, or to the drives found in some iPods.

Memory (RAM)

The Apple MacBook Pro 17-inch model comes with a full 4 GB of RAM, and can be upgraded to 8 GB of RAM for an additional $1,200. So if you add the large solid state drive and the full 8 GB of RAM your new MacBook will cost about $5,000.

Most people will find the 4 GB of RAM sufficient, but for the frequent traveller I would recommend adding the solid state drive for its sheer durability.  More on the 17-inch MacBook Pro below:

17-inch Tech Specs
Height: 0.98 inch (2.50 cm)
Width: 15.47 inches (39.3 cm)
Depth: 10.51 inches (26.7 cm)
Weight: 6.6 pounds (2.99 kg)Display: 17-inch (viewable)
LED-backlit glossy widescreen
1920 by 1200 pixelsBattery: Built-in lithium-polymer
Up to 8 hours of wireless productivityConnections and Expansion:
MagSafe power port
Gigabit Ethernet port
One FireWire 800 port (up to 800 Mbps)
Three USB 2.0 ports (up to 480 Mbps)
Mini DisplayPort
Audio line in
Audio line out
ExpressCard/34 slot
Security cable lock slot
Included Software:
Mac OS X v10.5 Leopard
Time Machine
Mail
iChat
Safari
Photo Booth
Front Row
Boot Camp

iLife ’09

  • iPhoto
  • iMovie
  • GarageBand
  • iDVD
  • iWeb
Apple Online Store

Great Advice for New Computer Owners

Rob Pegoraro of The Washington Post has an excellent article, “Pre-Flight Instructions For Your New Computer”, for new computer owners. Whether you have a new PC or a new Mac he offers excellent advice for getting started with your new computer.  Here are a few of the recommendations he’s made for users of Windows Vista and Mac OS X Leopard:

  • Activate the pre-installed antivirus on a PC. (Skylarking note: Or download Avast at www.avast.com, and download the Home edition. It’s free if you only have it iusntalled on one PC in your household. Mac users can consider getting an antivirus program at the Apple Store online to spare your PC using friends from viruses you might accidentally pass on.)
  • Turn on the firewall on your Mac: Click System Preferences >> Security>> Firewall >> “Set access for specific services and applications”. (Note: The firewall on Windows Vista PC is active out of the box.)
  • Download system updates. Vista: Start >> Control Panel >> Check for updates. Mac: Apple-icon >> Software Update.
  • Remove “trialware” and buy the $150 Home and Student Edition of Microsoft Office 2007, or download the free OpenOffice 3 at http://openoffice.org or use the free Google Docs Web-based software at http://docs.google.com. Uninstall software via Start >> Control Panel >> Uninstall a program.
  • Declutter the desktop: Drag and drop unwanted icons into the Recycle Bin, or use right-click and delete on the icons.
  • Declutter the Mac’s Dock: Drag unwanted icons off the Dock, and they’ll vanish.
  • Backup: Use Windows Vista’s Backup and Restore Center with an external drive, or, if you have a broadband connection, use a free online backup via Mozy at http://mozy.com.
  • Backup on a Mac: Get an external hard driveand use Apple’s Time Machine software.
  • Surfing the Web? Get Mozilla Firefox, http://mozilla.com, for free. Many people prefer it over the Microsoft’s Internet Explorer and Mac’s Safari.
  • Rest: Don’t rush to install your old programs, and “don’t go crazy trying out new ones.”
  • For an old printer or scanner: Go to the manufacturer’s web site and download the updated drivers instad of using the ones on the original CDs. (Skylarking note: You might also find that the Windows drivers are sufficient for operationg these items.)

He makes additional suggestions regarding email applications (Thunderbird, Windows Mail, Windows Live Mail), music and video playing software (iTunes), and photo editing tools such as Picasa.

Check out Rob Pegoraro’s article in full and enjoy your new computer. Happy holidays!




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News Stories I Passed On This Week


How’s that for a headline?  There were a few stories that popped up the past few days that I could have written about, but, ultimately, I decided not to write about them …. until now.

Two stories were Apple related:

Mac Sales Slow (Tuesday, Dec. 16)

macThe Wall Street Journal and various other news sources reported a drop in sales of Mac computers in November 2008.  According to the NPD Group, computer sales overall increased by 2 to 7% over the previous year, but Mac sales dropped by 1%. Though they did note that it desktop Mac sales dropped by 35% its sales of laptops compensated for it.
Other companies such as Dell and Hewlett-Packard saw a growth in sales due to the rising popularity of the ultra-portable, ultra-mobile netbooks. Mac, on the other hand, did not have a comparable product on the market.

Apple Announces Its Last Year at Macworld (Tuesday, Dec. 16)

Steve Jobs, "not to be", at MacWorld

Steve Jobs, "not to be", at MacWorld

macworld-logoApple announced that 2009 is the last year the company will exhibit at the Macworld Expo, and it will be Apple’s last keynote at the show. In the past the big speaker has been Steve Jobs, but he has cancelled his appearance at the Jan. 5-9, 2009 event. Philip Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president of Worldwide Product Marketing, will deliver the opening keynote instead.
Apple is scaling back appearances at trade shows overall, but they plan on hosting their own events instead. This isn’t so surprising as other Apple products have greater popularity these days than their computers. Most notable are the iPhone and the iPod.

One was about a favorite monkey…

Monkey Tales Plagiarism Exposed

Monkey Fables and Tales

Monkey Fables and Tales

Charlie Hatton

Charlie Hatton

Well, this isn’t really news, but you may recall I reviewed a blog entitled Monkey Fables and Tales back in Sept. 2008. I hadn’t looked at this blog in a few weeks recently, and when I went to read it earlier this week, I found it was gone without a trace. It turns out that the blog had been copied almost word for word from Bosten stand-up comic Charlie Hatton’s web site “Where the Hell Was I?” Charlie’s little known site had been idle for some time as he was involved in other projects. Meanwhile, Monkey Tales had become a favorite of the Entrecard link circuit which was the site of a conversation on just what became of the monkey.  Charlie Hatton was a participant in the conversation.
I often wondered about Monkey Tales silence amidst so much commentary from fans. The charade may explain it all.  Bloggers are now wondering if Charlie Hatton will write again. For now, you can read Charlie’s retelling of how he found out about Monkey Tales. Other stories can be found at My Dear Hard Drive, and at Lainy’s Musings and there are others. Bad, monkey, bad!

Internet Explorer Emergency Patch Released (Wed., Dec. 17)

Okay, I did write about this one. If you didn’t read it, here’s your chance to read about the Internet explorer patch and why you should get it now. And check up on your antivirus software while you’re at it.


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Pico Projector No. 2: Optoma PK 101

Optoma PK101 Projector

Optoma PK101 Projector

Yesterday, I discussed the first of two pico-projectors to hit the market: The Dell M109S. Today I’ll discuss the second, the Optoma PK-101 PICO Pocket Projector which, coincidentally, became officially available yesterday. I’ve only been able to find it online at Amazon.com (pre-order) and eBay at this time. It sells for $399, $50 less than the Dell M109S, but don’t stop reading yet.

First off, these units aren’t meant to replace your large home video projectors. Home units, which are designed for lit room viewing, are much much brighter than these mini-projectors, but the home units aren’t exactly portable or easy to transport and setup. And you certaily won’t fit a home unit in your pocket or handbag. These mini pico-projectors are portable, and are very very easy to setup. The Optoma PK101 will fit in your pocket, and the Dell M109S will fit in a slightly larger pocket. (FYI, you may very well see a pico-projector in future cellphones and portable computers for projecting images on a wall or other light colored surface.)

Back to the PK 101 from Optoma

The PK 101 is much smaller and lighter than the Dell M109S. It’s just over half an inch thick, 2 inches wide, and 4 inches long. It weighs only 4 ounces — a third the weight of the M109S (13 ounces), but the PK101 is only a fifth as bright as the Dell unit.  The Optoma is rated at 11 lumens versus the M109S’s 50 lumens. (Current home theater units are rated at 1,000 to 2,500 lumens).

The PK101 runs on a battery, which lasts for 2 hours of usage. There is a second battery included which can be swapped when the first one dies. The Dell M109S runs on an AC adapter, and there is no battery option. The PK101 has a AC adapter, too. The lower lumens rating is probably intended to conserve the PK101’s battery life. Both units work best in a dimly lit or dark room.

The plus side for the PK101 is that it is supposed to include a cable for connecting it to your iPod, so you can project video and slideshows. The Dell M109S can also be connected to an iPod, but you’ll have to buy the connecting cable from Apple: Apple Composite AV Cable – Apple Store (U.S.). The cable costs $50.

About Connectivity

The PK101 connects to iPods and iPhones with its included bundled connection kit. It can also be connected to camcorders, DV-Cams, and Digital Cameras with their standard composite AV Outs with the PK101’s included composite cable. You can also connect it to DVD Players and other video players. The same holds true for the Dell M109S (Note: I mentioned earlier a special cable is needed from Apple to connect the M109S to a iPod or iPhone).

Dell M109S

Dell M109S

The Optoma PK101 isn’t configured for connecting to a laptop or computer. unless the computer itself as a special video output.

The Optoma PK101 is the more atractive of the two units with its sleek finish, though some have complained it is prone to showing fingerprints and smudges. The Dell M109S has a brighter and sharper image, but no battery option. For computer and video connectivity, I’d be prone to go with the M109S. If I were more interested in iPod video connectivity, I might be inclined to go with the Optoma PK101, though I could always get the Apple cable to connect to the M109S.

I think the three questions you need to ask yourself when decing on these two units are: Do I need an option to run on a battery, or will I usually have access to a power outlet? What will I connect to more: an iPod or a computer? Do I want to drop it in my pocket or carry it in a briefcase or bag?

Update (Mar. 31, 2009): Connect Optoma PK-101 to a MacBook Air

Apple Micro-DVI to Video Adapter

The Optoma PK 101 is designed to connect to devices that have composite video connections. The MacBook Air has a mini display port that can be used as follows:

  • DVI output using Mini DisplayPort to DVI Adapter
  • VGA output using Mini DisplayPort to VGA Adapter
  • Dual-link DVI output using Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI Adapter

This is according to the MacBook Air’s Technical Specifications web page.

According to a MacBook Air Developer Note from Jan. 18, 2008:

The MacBook Air ships with a micro-DVI to DVI adapter and a micro-DVI to VGA adapter. A micro-DVI to video adapter, which provides composite and S-video support, is sold separately.

The Apple Micro-DVI to Video Adapter (shown above right) is available from the Apple Store in the US and Canada for $19. Apple says, “The Micro-DVI to Video Adapter was designed specifically to fit the slim profile of MacBook Air. The adapter connects to the Micro-DVI port on your MacBook Air and provides both S-video and Composite video connectors so that you can view content from your computer on such devices as TVs, VCRs, or overhead projectors with S-Video or RCA (Composite) connectors.”




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Apple Encourages AntiVirus Use for Macs?!

[Links in this article were updated 12/2010] This was an article I had started on Dec. 1, but never finished. I publish it now because an interesting twist came along later.

Apple updated an article on its knowledge base site to encourage “the widespread use of multiple antivirus utilities” on Mac computers:

On November 21, 2008, article HT2550 as follows:

Summary
Learn about antivirus utilities available for the Mac OS.

Products Affected
Consumer Software, Mac OS

Apple encourages the widespread use of multiple antivirus utilities so that virus programmers have more than one application to circumvent, thus making the whole virus writing process more difficult. Here are some available antivirus utilities:

  • Intego VirusBarrier X5, available from the Apple Online Store
    License: commercial
  • Symantec Norton Anti-Virus 11 for Macintosh, available from the Apple Online Store
    License: commercial
  • McAfee VirusScan for Mac
    License: commercial

I’ve encouraged the use of anti-virus software on Macs for a long time now. Mainly due to the possibility that Macs could become carriers of PC viruses. A Mac user could unknowingly receive an infected document and then forward it to someone else; not knowing they had just passed on an infected file.

As I said, I never published the post, but several other blogs and news outlets reported on it, most notable Brian Krebs of the Washington Post. Then came the twist, Apple pulled the report from its Knowledge Base.

I still endorse the use of antivirus software on Macs. Sure, there are few Mac viruses out there, but the number will likely grow along with their popularity; and, sure, Macs need not worry about being affected by PC viruses, but there is still the risk that a Mac user will unknowingly receive and forward an infected file.  Restated, a person using a Mac might receive an infected article, and not know it was infected, and then forward it to someone else, perhaps to a PC using friend.

Don’t let your Mac be a “Typhoid Mary”. (Mary Mallon (1869-1938) was a cook who was found to be a healthy carrier of typhoid fever. She never succombed to the illness, but many people around her did).

Look into a quality antivirus program for your Mac, particularly if you share file with PC using friends. After all, not all of them are using an antivirus utility either.

Symantec’s Norton AntiVirus for Mac is available from these online retailers:


Norton AntiVirus 11 for Mac

is the world s most trusted antivirus solution for Mac systems.* It removes
viruses automatically, cleans infected Internet and email downloads, and
protects against advanced online threats and attacks that target software
vulnerabilities. It s also compatible with Mac OS X v10.5 and takes full
advantage of the new operating system s advanced features to help you protect
your Mac even better. Powerful, built-in vulnerability protection helps
prevent identity thieves from exploiting newly discovered application and
operating system weaknesses. And as always, LiveUpdate makes it easy to
keep your virus and vulnerability protection updates current against new
threats. Includes Norton AntiVirus 2009 for Windows to protect those who
use their Intel based Mac to run Mac OS X and Windows operating systems.

Symantec Norton Internet Security v.4.0 for Mac Internet Security – Complete
Product – 1 User – Mac, Intel-based Mac
Integrated,
nonintrusive security suite with a simple, easy-to-use interface that includes
protection found in Norton AntiVirus v.11.0 for Mac, Norton Confidential,
and two-way firewall functionality and automatically detects and removes
spyware, viruses, Trojan horses, malware, and Internet worms.

Intego NetBarrier X5 – Complete Product – Standard – 1 User – Retail – Mac
:
Intego VirusBarrier X5 is the simple, fast and non-intrusive antivirus solution
for Macintosh computers. It offers thorough protection against viruses and
malware of all types, coming from infected files or applications, whether
on CD-ROMs, DVDs or other removable media, or in files downloaded over the
Internet or other types of networks.

BitDefender Antivirus Antivirus – 2 User – Intel-based Mac

pro-actively protects 2 Macs for 2 years against the new breed of Mac viruses.
Plus, it destroys Windows viruses (which don’t affect Macs) so that you
don’t accidentally pass them on to your family, friends and colleagues using
PCs.